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You can't escape the dentist, even mid-Atlantic...

An interesting start to New Year's day aboard Rona II. The dawn light
enabled a field dental practice to open for a short time on the aft deck.
Watch Officer George Hopkins, after walking head first into a spinnaker pole
last night came off with a chipped tooth. After a night of discomfort his
Watch Leader and newly qualified dentist Sam Wareing took to the tooth with
an emery file to curb the sharp edge. At the other end of the hierarchy the
Mongol deputy Director of Renewable Resources has been suddenly fired from
his post on allowing a tin can to fall into the bilge, the height of
incompetence in his line of work and the last straw adding to a string of
minor offences.

The effects of a post Christmas comedown hasn't affected the standing of
Rona II in the race, holding first in class and sixth in the fleet overall.
With the Mayans back on mother watch; breakfast was churned out and squared
away within the hour leaving time for Mate, Andy Wright, to present a short
lecture on weather and the importance of pressure systems. Two members of
the audience were branded with permanent marker on their hand for giving
silly answers, a third was marked with a reminder to, "pay more attention" -
the said crew member had no regrets and later remarked "this was a life
skill I needed to learn".

The Mate has decreed that we are close enough to the finish line to use
fresh water to wash up instead of sea water and there has been a subtle
improvement in tea and coffee thanks to the lack of salt lining the rims of
cups.

In other news, a recent mystery has been solved after two bottles of Big Mac
sauce and a can of Red Bull bought from a Canadian supermarket were
misplaced shortly before departure. Over a week has passed with a "missing"
poster pinned up and finally the original owner has located his property, of
course in amongst his own gear, much to his own delight and the the rest of
the crew's general disinterest.

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Rona returns to Universal and familiar waters!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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