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Stop press: The Sable Island Argus

2nd August 2017

Last night, just hours into her Atlantic adventure, Rona II was struck by a
natural disaster. The phenomenon has yet to be precisely identified, with
baffled experts variously referring to it as a 'vomcano' or 'vomit comet'.

At 1855 crew member Louis Janota leapt from his bunk and dashed to the heads
whereupon he unleashed a vicious torrent of luminous orange, semidigested
chilli con carni. The liquid's unusual colour has been attributed to the
'Tang' consumed in considerable quantity by the crew just an hour earlier.
Mr Janota, 18, has been praised for his presence of mind in securing himself
in the heads, preventing much greater damage being done. Nevertheless the
disaster took its toll. A visibly shaken George Hopkins, among the first to
see the port heads after the event, declared a natural disaster, and stated
solemnly that 'in over 20 years with the Rona Sailing Project I've never
seen anything like it', noting that all four walls and even the ceiling were
touched by the orange tide. Mr Janota has since made an admirably speedy
recovery and is currently fully participating in galley action. By now most
of the crew have seen at least some of their food more than once.

In other news, at 1100 today the race organisers authorised participants to
motor for 400 miles due to light capricious winds. On Friday we will
restart, hopefully with more wind! Encountering competitor Peter Von Danzig,
a vessel with less fuel on board than Rona II, skipper Gareth Parker offered
a tow, which was gratefully accepted.

With low winds and no sailing Matt Woodcock decided to open his pink dye
hair salon with two very keen customers, Matt Robinson and Andy Wright (the
mate). Matt was very disappointed with his new look - or lack thereof -
however the Mate has found his new style rejuvenating.

Later in the evening Rona II and Peter Von Danzig rendezvoused with Golden
Leeuw, to pass over the tow. The sight of people from the opposite sex made
all, perhaps especially Angus, increasingly happy.

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Rona II blog 23rd Aug 2017

> Disaster strikes! After arriving in the visitor marina of Le Havre at > 0430, > Rona II drove over a stray rope which had been left in the water. > This tangled around the propeller, causing the Skipper to call for the > anchor to be dropped a mere 10 metres from our intended mooring position. > The crew then had to inflate the rubber dinghy and set world class rower > Theo Darlow to take a line to shore where himself and Dr Sam Wareing > pulled > the boat in. > > In the morning, the afterguard set off to find a commercial diver to cut > the > rope free from the propeller. They located a man named Patrick, who > arrived > to the scene of the incident at about 1500 donning full scuba gear; he > quickly got into the water and began working away at the stern of Rona II. > After roughly 45 minutes of fishing bits of rope from the marina water, > the > crew saw Patrick emerge victorious. Angus Elliman used his

Rona II and a more modern vessel - "El Galeon" -in the background...

 

Rona II - Current Tactics

Greetings from Rona II. It's early morning on Monday, still dark, and has been a busy night as we've changed steadily down from genoa, staysail, full main and mizzen, to no 2 yankee, staysail, second reef and mizzen. The wind has come aft a little and we are trucking along. Tactically over the next couple of days we're trying to play to Rona II's strengths. She's an absolute weapon with the wind a little aft of the beam and around 18 knots of breeze, so with more wind (and a higher sea state) to the north west, and less of both to the south east, we're adjusting our (generally north east) course to try and keep ourselves in exactly that much wind. Ultimately it looks like we'll go quite a long way north before turning east, covering a longer distance in order to stay in Rona II's sweet spot for as long as possible. It's too early to properly know what the rest of the fleet is doing but we suspect we're the most north