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Rona returns to Universal and familiar waters!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The 21st of August on Rona 2 saw the Mayans on mother watch again. Leaving
the hard job of motoring from Swanage Bay to Portsmouth to the Vikings and
Mongols. Luckily moods were high as last night around 10 pm Ed Clark's
parents kayaked out, whilst we were at anchor in Swanage Bay in the heavy
rain to see their precious child and drop off a care package of Ed's mums
famous flapjacks. Something that the crew has been looking forward to
eagerly all day.

The day also consisted of a trip up the mast for crew member Theo Darlow to
retrieve the burgee and fix some minor problems with the head of the
mainsail. He later commented, "it's a lot higher than it looks", yet
maintains he wishes he'd been able to go higher. Whilst Theo was up the
mast, occasionally, dropping things on his unsuspecting crew who had winched
him up the mast, Rona 2 was skillfully steered up the Hamble River to
Universal Shipyard. On arrival at Universal the torn spinnakers where taken
off along with the one surviving spinnaker that the Mongols had not managed
to get their hands on. As we neared our home berth we were warmly greeted
by Mark our Shipwright and the protector of all innocents, Ann Bowers. As
well as this repairs to the boat were made and replacements were found for
all broken and missing equipment such as the disappearing red boat hook.
The Main suspect for this heinous crime is George Hopkins as he was reported
saying he, "never liked the red boat hooks". After the boat was returned to
its rightful state the Mayans produced a lunch of calzone and garlic bread
which was met with nothing but good remarks from the crew and our esteemed
guests'. The crew then set about storing all the fresh food acquired at the
Tesco near Universal Shipyards then set out for Portsmouth. Whilst under
motor the main halyard was replaced a skilful and risky task as it can leave
you with no useable main halyard, luckily the task was competently managed
by newly appointed watch officer Mathew Woodcock and the new halyard hangs
in place inside the mast as you read this. Once we reached Portsmouth we
where escorted to our berth by project watch officer Claire Smith in her
rib!

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