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Rona on tour! 25th Aug 2017

Rona on tour

For the people of France a mass of 22 Rona crew members must have been an
intimidating experience, however this is the situation we found ourselves in
when we went for a look around the local area.

Breakfast was a fairly normal experience with the Vikings smashing it out so
much to have nothing to do for 30 minutes except eating the first two
courses before anyone else on the boat had woken up (which was all thanks to
the incredible leadership of watch leader for a day Alex McFarlane) . On top
of that they also got not one, not two, but three congratulations from none
other than Nathan Meager (the mate)!!! The first step of our adventure took
us to the town of Bayeux. For those who don't know the importance of this
town it is the location of the Bayeux tapestry which depicts the run up of
events and the battle where William the Conquer defeats King Harold in 1066
at Hastings. This was followed by a walk around town to take in the culture
followed up by Viking sandwiches which are simply the act of filling a
baguette with as much meat, dairy and vegetables as one can stuff in.

After Bayeux we took a bus down to Arromanches which is famous for the D-Day
landings towards the end of the second world war. The town whilst beautiful
is mildly touristy with every other shop being a souvenir shop selling the
same items (of which I bought a few...) and various era specific guns that
are little more than statues now though probably would have been quite
intimidating back when they were in use. The crew split into three main
groups: cultural, food and mixed. The cultural people sought out every
museum and item of historical importance in the area. Foodies went on a hunt
for ice-cream, coffee and crepes and the mixed went for a general walk
around the town and took in the sights. Towards the end of the day some of
the crew found themselves in the ocean lead by the valiant Olly "The Beast"
Jones, who even managed to coax Ed "Rocks" Clark into the water after he was
quoted in saying "I can't go in there as there is too much concrete and not
enough sand"... Upon exiting the water the skipper could be seen drying out
on the headland, which would have been fine if he wasn't shirtless in the
middle of a distinguished outside café dripping wet. On the way home our
very own "Baby" Matt Robinson nearly left his bag with all his personal
belongings on a bus, but once again was saved by the ever vigilant Olly "The
Beast" Jones who reminded him before it was too late. I now find myself on
board with my Watch Officer Matt Woodcock breathing down my neck and the
chemists/chefs creating meatbake with a side of pasta and so I must depart.
See you all in three days.

BEAST

(Side note: Apologies to Angus for forgetting about him during dinner as he
lay asleep in his bunk. It wasn't personal...)

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