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Rona II rocking the waves again...............................

Today were are heading back to The Hamble, home of the Rona Sailing Project.
The morning started with a breakfast cooked by the Mongols which consisted
of cereals and scrambled eggs with all day breakfast; which is to a much
higher standard than previous years. Before we set sail, the boat was
refueled at the berth that was a mere boat length away (that's roughly 68
foot) whilst the motherwatch crew stayed below decks emptying and sorting
all of the food lockers so that it is possible to cook a meal without waking
every possible member of crew.

We left Sutton Lock Marina at 0930 and have been traveling east along a
course which the crew still seems to think as optional, much to the
disappointment of the Skipper. However, our average speed is about 10 knots,
and our most recent YellowBrick shows us at 12.3. We would all like to thank
Sutton Marina and Plymouth for their kind reception and hospitality, and
would kindly request that any videos featuring the afterguard in OMG not be
posted publicly.

As part of a training exercise, every man on the boat will be trialing the
position above their own, with crew becoming Watch Leaders, Watch Leaders
becoming Watch Officers (or becoming crew in the case of Ed "Rocks" Clark),
etc. One of the duties that differs from crew to WL is taking charge of
cooking when on motherwatch. Today was Angus Elliman's turn to show his
culinary strengths, and the other watches were impressed. For a morning
snack, the Mongols planned to makes cheese twists for the rest of the crew.
This proved to be very difficult, as all the recipes we could find either
required premade puff pastry, or butter that was not already a liquid.
However, this seemed not to matter, and all three watches were very happy
with the slightly undercooked snack. Lunch was a ham and vegetable risotto
with a start (or follow up, depending which watch you were in) of leek and
potato soup; although this meal was slightly late, it was very enjoyable and
had many of the crew asking for seconds. The final meal of the day was
ex-constructed burgers with ratatouille, and a desert of deconstructed
constructed cheesecake. We really do try to keep the food in one piece, but
when you're trying to divide a 10" cheesecake by 24 people, it tends to
crumble. Luckily, Gareth Parker is no longer on the boat, as he was most
annoyed when receiving deconstructed food.

The Skipper, Andy Wright, has also been sharing his expertise with the
Mayans by teaching them how to get their day skipper qualification. These
lessons are useful prior knowledge before the crew and watch leaders embark
on their Day Skipper Theory course over the coming years. Each Mayan has
been given a specific subject to revise before Andy gives one of many
lectures, possibly later this evening. It's not only the Skipper that has
been sharing his knowledge, however, as many crewmembers have been very
helpful towards their colleagues by educating them on items such as points
of sail and navigation marks.

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