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Rona II blog 24th Aug 17

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From: <ronaii@mailasail.com>
Sent: Friday, August 25, 2017 7:26 PM
To: <ronaii@mailasail.com>
Subject: boat blog

> I have a confession to make today I Theo Darlow have attempted to make
> cakes without the approved Rona cake mix. Its really hard!!!!! It all
> started when i was instructed to make a sponge. First of by creaming the
> sugar, butter and eggs together. Now I'm not a baker, although I have
> watched the great British bake off so was a self proclaimed expert. No
> longer. I didn't realise that you don't need cream to cream something
> together. We didn't have any cream so the next best thing was milk. I had
> also been told equal amounts of everything I had used 500g of everything
> else so I assumed 500 ml of milk was also to be added, to complete the
> creaming process. This made some sort mixture that resembled scrambled
> eggs. I persevered adding the flour and beat them together to make a
> slightly thicker paste still looking like scrambled eggs but greyer. In my
> ignoranceIi continued putting this questionable mixture into cake tin's
> then put them in the oven. I then proceeded to forget they where there for
> 35 mins whilst making a domino tower (5 stories high) I then remembered
> them because off the smell of burning sugar. I pulled the interesting
> cakes out of the oven which looked like slightly burnt solid rice pudding.
> At this point I knew there was something wrong with the mixture I had
> prepared i then proceeded to pour it down the sink. However I still served
> them to the Viking watch on deck with spoons to because of the interesting
> texture they were all eaten to my surprise and had apparently had been
> like steamed pudding. That was attempt number one. Attempt number two
> started a lot better with I got the mixture really sorted except the fact
> of two much sugar which would prove to be a problem later on once this
> batch was put in cake tins I put them in the oven however they rose
> slightly too much and collapsed and made Yorkshire puddings. I then filled
> each hole with left over cake mix claiming it was icing then putt jam on
> it then survived them at lunch. These were again accepted with great
> reports. This is proof that anything can taste nice if you drown it in
> sugar.
>
> Whilst my baking debacle was going on the rest of the crew steered the
> boat up a canal to Caen past Pegasus bridge. Theo Normanton was thoroughly
> unimpressed by the bog standard bridge that was the first liberated part
> of France during D-day. Saying for such an important bridge it looks a
> bit standard. This coming from one of Rona 2's most cultured crew members.
> After the bridge we came into Caen and are now tied up in the city centre
> which looks a bit caenfusing.

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