Skip to main content

Rona II blog 23rd Aug 2017

> Disaster strikes! After arriving in the visitor marina of Le Havre at
> 0430,
> Rona II drove over a stray rope which had been left in the water.
> This tangled around the propeller, causing the Skipper to call for the
> anchor to be dropped a mere 10 metres from our intended mooring position.
> The crew then had to inflate the rubber dinghy and set world class rower
> Theo Darlow to take a line to shore where himself and Dr Sam Wareing
> pulled
> the boat in.
>
> In the morning, the afterguard set off to find a commercial diver to cut
> the
> rope free from the propeller. They located a man named Patrick, who
> arrived
> to the scene of the incident at about 1500 donning full scuba gear; he
> quickly got into the water and began working away at the stern of Rona II.
> After roughly 45 minutes of fishing bits of rope from the marina water,
> the
> crew saw Patrick emerge victorious. Angus Elliman used his bilingual
> talent
> to ask the hero how long he had been diving for prior to this, discovering
> that he was not, in fact, a commercial diver, and only dived on Sundays.
> Nevertheless, the whole crew was thankful for his services and the Skipper
> tipped him 20 euros.
>
> In the evening, the afterguard set the crew on an inter-watch photo
> competition, with items such as "smallest dog in Le Havre" and "best
> plank".
> When attempting to get a photo in an Irish pub, Cambridge fresher Theo
> Normanton managed to persuade the barkeep to let the rest of the Vikings,
> as
> well as all of the Mongols behind the bar (eat it Mayans), and again in
> the
> pub next-door. He also managed to begin planning the crew party, going as
> far as to ask if there was an Irish band that would be willing to play on
> Rona. The owner/bartender was happy to assist, exchanging contact details
> and getting in touch with his associates to secure us a band as soon as
> the
> crew left. We look forward to seeing him again when we return to Le Havre.

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

The Battle for the Baltimore

The Battle for the Baltimore

Twenty-Hundred hours aboard Rona II, red-watch were on deck as they spotted
something, a mere speck on the horizon. By nightfall, the speck had become a
clear outline of the much feared, feeder race winning, 'Pride of Baltimore'.
A gaff rigged schooner with raked masts and a skipper who could out salt the
sea itself.
It became a straight face off, who could hold their nerve, the race for
Boston just got red. 11pm arrived and white-watch appeared from their
slumber to the news that Baltimore were in reach. The race for the Rona boys
was truly on. "Action stations Boys" exclaimed Mr Parry, the officer on
deck.
And with that the Mizzen was swiftly hoisted and a full trim of the sails
was wistfully undertaken.
Three miles to the east, Baltimore winced! With that Rona II sped past. By
the end of their watch they had done all that they could, a 1 mile lead was
established; white-watch were sent below, job done.
Next u…

Leg 5 is off! Excited crew... Excited parents too we suspect...

Come Sail with the RSP - and get wet...

You know that feeling where you're trying to go to sleep but a trickle of
water is falling on your head? That feeling where your bed leans back and
forth at angles of up to thirty degrees, and every tilt brings a fresh gush
of water onto your sleeping bag with the volume and intensity of a small
power shower? When you are on your bunk one moment and one metre above it
the next? That simultaneously funny and sickening moment when a crack team
of soggy sailors rushes into your bedroom to pump out the ever-increasing
tide of seawater under your bunk? No? Come sail with the Rona Sailing
Project, and all this could be yours. Yes, we have finally reached that
long-awaited stage of the voyage where the helmsman and lookouts must wear
ski goggles to see through the spray, the widely agreed marker for the
apogee of excitement in any sailing trip. Last night we encountered winds of
up to gale force nine, building until midnight. Luminescence made this
moment all the more memora…