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Come Sail with the RSP - and get wet...

You know that feeling where you're trying to go to sleep but a trickle of
water is falling on your head? That feeling where your bed leans back and
forth at angles of up to thirty degrees, and every tilt brings a fresh gush
of water onto your sleeping bag with the volume and intensity of a small
power shower? When you are on your bunk one moment and one metre above it
the next? That simultaneously funny and sickening moment when a crack team
of soggy sailors rushes into your bedroom to pump out the ever-increasing
tide of seawater under your bunk? No? Come sail with the Rona Sailing
Project, and all this could be yours. Yes, we have finally reached that
long-awaited stage of the voyage where the helmsman and lookouts must wear
ski goggles to see through the spray, the widely agreed marker for the
apogee of excitement in any sailing trip. Last night we encountered winds of
up to gale force nine, building until midnight. Luminescence made this
moment all the more memorable and the regular waterfalls of spray crashing
over the cockpit brought with them beautiful sparks which stuck to our
waterproofs, reminding us of a light show. All three guard rails were
submerged in the sea at times, and the skipper at the helm was repeatedly
knocked down by the force of the spray (but got up again immediately every
time). The watch sat in the cockpit did not sit on the bench on the low
side, but rather stood on it, with their backs resting against the bench on
the high side, such was the angle of the boat .The opening of the first
storm box was fully justified, and was rewarded by handfuls of Cliff Bars
and protein snacks to fuel the watch on deck. In spite of these trying
conditions, though, the crew's smiles are as wide as ever. After all, it
wouldn't be a proper Atlantic crossing without a healthy dose of storm.

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Rona II blog 23rd Aug 2017

> Disaster strikes! After arriving in the visitor marina of Le Havre at
> 0430,
> Rona II drove over a stray rope which had been left in the water.
> This tangled around the propeller, causing the Skipper to call for the
> anchor to be dropped a mere 10 metres from our intended mooring position.
> The crew then had to inflate the rubber dinghy and set world class rower
> Theo Darlow to take a line to shore where himself and Dr Sam Wareing
> pulled
> the boat in.
>
> In the morning, the afterguard set off to find a commercial diver to cut
> the
> rope free from the propeller. They located a man named Patrick, who
> arrived
> to the scene of the incident at about 1500 donning full scuba gear; he
> quickly got into the water and began working away at the stern of Rona II.
> After roughly 45 minutes of fishing bits of rope from the marina water,
> the
> crew saw Patrick emerge victorious. Angus Elliman used his bilingual
> …

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