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A summary of the inland waterways of Normandy.
Rona II engages full holiday mode. After 24 hours in Le Harve we set sail
for the historic town of Caen on the morning tide. After a not-too-vigorous
motor sail to Oustreham, we took a trip through a lock, under the famous
Pegasus Bridge we arrived at our miniature pontoon (made for yachts about
half our size) set right in the middle of beautiful Caen. Upon our arrival
we were greeted by -- nobody. This level of service and general attendance
at work has become a common observation of the French for the crew. We
responded by posting lookouts in the cockpit to catch the marina office
attendants when they arrived for their ten-minute shift and to direct them
to the nearest Normanton to negotiate the terms of our stay.

We spent the following day on a trip out soaking up the rich culture the
area has to offer. We took a very fancy train to Bayeux and the whole crew
visited the ancient Bayeux tapestry. Other activities involved visiting the
cathedral and eating crepes. We then had mother-assembled baguettes in the
park and boarded a coach for Arromanches. In this fascinating site of the
D-day landings the crew did all sorts including walking the hills, visiting
the D-day museum and eating crepes.

Our final day in Caen was spent very much freely to the whims of each crew
member. Ed, Nathan and Callum went for a post-breakfast run taking in the
two cathedrals, castle and a beautiful vista over the full city. After this
the afterguard and a couple of the crew headed to Pegasus bridge and
Oustreham. Among other things they became the rowdy lot cheering along a
water-borne jousting competition. The rest of the crew spent their time
in-and-around Caen. Activities included visiting memorials,
stand-up-paddle-boarding and eating crepes. The day was ended with a
crew-wide volleyball game in the city centre. Everybody slept with sand in
their bunks that night.

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