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Our Ship In Flight

A frustrating day on a too calm sea brought with it bitter sweet news.
Whilst most of the crew were hanging over the scuppers Len made an
announcement at our 4pm happy hour, "tomorrow at 14:00 UTC the race will be
brought to an early finish". Naturally we were all upset that we won't be
racing all the way to Bermuda but in some ways this is welcome news. The
thought of bobbing through this wind hole until the 30th only to motor the
rest of the way in time for our flight was not a prospect anyone was excited
for. At least this way the crew get to descend on Bermuda and show the
locals the Rona II spirit (with a few extra spirits if you catch my drift).
Now we have 16 hours (at time of writing) to race to the best place.

So how did the second to last day racing go on Rona II? Most of the crew
were woken up by the sound of the main sail flogging as hour by hour the
breeze dwindled into nothing. At 7am white watch where hoisting a spinnaker
over a glassy ocean, disappointing as it was to have no wind it did make a
mesmerising sun rise. Once the asymmetric spinnaker was up trying to get it
to fill and fly was like encouraging a shy squirrel to take a peanut from
your hand; tedious and unsuccessful for the first three hours.

The slow pace of the boat should have made for perfect fishing conditions.
Mark rigged up his £140 ocean fishing gear and waited for a big one to bite.
When the line jumped red watch gathered to pull it in. Unbelievably on the
end of the line attached to the hook was a terrifying lump of seaweed.
However, all was not lost, Mark did manage to catch crabs, just a few little
ones that once called that seaweed home. How does that saying go, all the
gear and?

The midweek point gives a few lucky members of the crew the opportunity to
open care packages brought with them from home. Without a doubt Katie's
trumped everyone else's (huge shout out to Pingu), the bottle of prosecco,
salted caramel chocolate and sachets of lattes are all anyone can dream
about. Although Alexa's is all anyone can smell (cheers for the air
freshener Chris).

Rona sails on to Bermuda with a new lease of life tonight, there may only be
16 hours of racing left but the journey well and truly continues.

The sun sunk slowly,
Beyond the edge of sight,
The watches sailed on,
Riding the blue kite
Above peered the stars,
And dazzling moonlight,
Noisy waves kissed the bow,
Awash with delight.
Earth is no more,
Our ship is in flight,
Between space and sea
Just us tonight.

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