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It Was All Going So Easily...

It was all going so easy,
The wind was light and breezy,
The sails were set and flying,
until the halyard started dying.
One spinnaker in the water,
back on deck the girls fought her.
And when that spinnaker was a wrap,
The Rona girls didn't flap.
Life on the water can be hard work,
Especially when sailing is berserk.
Because we're the girls of Rona II,
There's nothing that we cannot do!

In the last 24 hours the boat and the crew have been tested. You could say
it has been a rollercoaster, but a log flume would probably be a more
appropriate. What started as a calm day with a neopolitan sunrise rapidly
turned into a never ending exercise. Sails were up and down, wet and dry,
flying and twisted, but with Len and Chris at the helm (quite literally when
things got tricky) the crew have come out wiser, stronger and even more
determined to get to Bermuda first.
When the spinnaker came down at 7 am yesterday morning (14th May) in true
Rona spirit she was back on deck before you could whisper blue watch. As
with any ocean passage the halyards and sheets risk chafeing from hours of
continuous sailing, we've all learnt the lesson to check every 12 hours.
Clearly we're sailing hard!
Within the busy watches and the dedicated 24 hours of mother watch the whole
crew still makes time to come together. 4 o'clock = Happy hour (more like 20
minutes if we're lucky but we'll take that!). After the events of the day it
was lovely to sit down as a crew and rehydrate on chunky slices of juicy
watermelon. Fresh fruit has become our luxury!
And just like a log flume, we all got a good soaking at the end with a sea
water hose down in the cockpit! Nothing like a fairy liquid shower to make
you feel human again... OK maybe not that much like a log flume then.

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Rona II blog 23rd Aug 2017

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Rona returns to Universal and familiar waters!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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