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Halfway!

A massive milestone was conquered today! We have passed our halfway point
between the Canaries and Bermuda; as of 1700 GMT today we have sailed 1438
miles since the start line off the canaries, and have 1342 still to go!

A calm and muggy day today. Red watch made themselves useful by scrubbing
the decks of salt, crumbs, marshmallows and hot chocolate left over from
many night watches, onwhich much sugar is consumed.

We are continuing to drop, check and hoist spinnakers every 12 hours as
chafe of ropes has become our nemesis. Mother watch now have spinnaker
wooling added in amongst their preparation of breakfast and dinner, today
some excellent pancakes were made by Minna, despite having a wet sail to
deal with being passed through the galley. The main has been up for 8 days
solid and strong! No more climbing the rigging for now.

Happy hour today was a double whammy of halfway celebrations, us being half
way across the Atlantic, and Roz reaching half way to 50 years old! After an
excitement of birthday cake (Roz almost managed to blow out the 25 candles
before the wind got there first) and cans of coke almost cool from the aft
cabin bilges, the moment was chosen to crack out the mystery box. A treasure
trove of sugar disguised in various forms, including much anticipated lemon
curd. Also intriguingly a 'magic sponge', which Toby the mascot is now
guarding, and a children's colouring book.

We are currently ahead of Vahine and Spaniel on handicap, and will ensure to
keep it that way! Now that Bermuda is within reach, we have set up wagers
for our arrival time; after battling to get bets in by the hour, some became
more optimistic than others, we hoping to get there for Bermuda Day on the
26th.

Thought for the day: Humans are 90% water - we are basically cucumbers with
anxiety (albeit sea cucumbers).

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