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Blog Post - 2017-04-10

The day started in Dieppe with the first #runtheatlantic run of the trip - nobody was persuaded  to join him, so the mate did 6k on his own. While he did his run, a shore party picked up some croissants and pains-au-chocolate.

A chap approached Rona II, and then someone called Charlie to come up on deck, assuming it was a dockmaster. Charlie said 'bonjour monsieur, Ca Va' etc. etc. [essentially being envious of Harry's french skills which he used last night to call the harbour over the VHF]. The guy turned out to be the english skipper of the next door yacht and said 'you are really getting into the speaking french thing!' and then asked about Rona, so we explained to him about the project and the tall ships race.

The crew got in the 3 S's - to be clear - Showers, Shopping and Sightseeing, while the afterguard went for a quick coffee ashore, along with Toby the ship's mascot. For readers less versed in the terms we use - 'Afterguard' means basically the Skipper, the Mate, the Watch Officers and the Watch Leaders.

We then slipped from Dieppe, hosted the main and the number one genoa, and sailed up towards Boulogne. Rona II with the new Genoa is FAST and points HIGH.

Lunch was Pizzas made expertly by Mother Watch. Annoyingly (or predictably - it seems to be The Curse Of Blue Watch) the wind died and so the Iron Staysail was hoisted (meaning we turned on the engine).

After lunch of course was Happy Hour. It is Tom's birthday…. Which one? Well, for some reason, White Watch has three Toms and a Dom, and Tom got a cake for his 20th Birthday. After cake, we were entertained expertly by Tom and Dom where certain aspects of their teenage lives were expertly acted out by the other Toms and Becky.

Joke of the day - 'what happens if you park your frog on a double yellow line? you get toad'. Most people groaned very loudly, Skipper didn't get the joke and had to have it explained to him. Twice.

Supper was Carbonara A La Vegitarianne - basically Will forgot to put Ham into the Pasta-with-Ham.

After dark, we began picking up the lights of Boulogne, and so dropped sails and motored in. The nav lights in the Harbour seem to have little in common with the charts / almanac etc., so we proceeded slowly…

We didn't find anywhere to moor up, so we tied up next to the fireengine-boat on the customs pontoon.


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