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Race Day!

April 19th, Midday
Current position: 50.27.4 N, 3.31.6 W (currently alongside in Torquay)
Day's run: 0
Current rig: sails stowed

RACE DAY!

We are currently in Torquay harbour enjoying our last bit of shore leave
before we race to Sines. The sun is shining and the crew are in high spirits
ready to race.

We have sailed exactly zero miles since our last blog.

Rona II has been dressed to impress while in Torquay. The mizzen halyard was
almost lost during the dressing process when a bowline slipped, although it
was quickly retrieved by White watch sending one of the Toms (in this case
Tom C) up the mast, where he retrieved the halyard and took  a photo opportunity with Toby the boat mascot.

Last night Red watch treated the crew to roast chicken followed by apple
crumble and custard. There was even enough left to enjoy cold crumble with
tea this morning. The Skipper and Mate went to the prize giving of the
Torbay Small Ship's race. We had a few visitors, including our Trustee Dawn
Bishop, a local who had sailed on Rona II's maiden voyage in the 1992
Columbus Tall Ships Race, and a friend of our Watch Officer Paul, who was WL on the 1964 Atlantic race. We heard some extracts from the handwritten diary from the 1993
voyage, including a description of one of the most memorable days in his
life.

We are currently in final preparations for starting the race later today.
Mother watch have done a sterling job of baking a selection of artisan
breads (honey and fruit, seeded and whole meal) for the crew's delight at
happy hour this afternoon. The food has been stowed, kit secured and water
filled. Rona II is now ready to race.

Joke of the day: What do you call a boat with a hole in it? A sink.

(Blog by Becky)

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