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Across Biscay

22nd April 2017

Noon position: 43 26'.26 N 010 13'.56 W
(Rounding Cabo Finistere, Northern Spain)
24 hour mileage: 248
Current Rig: Spinnaker, Staysail, full main and mizzen

As Rona entered the Bay of Biscay with the Spinnaker up and storming along
at 10kts the wind began to build. Perhaps time to change sails!!

With a considerably reduced rig, Rona stormed across the bay, surfing down
waves at speeds of up to 16.5 knots keeping an average of 10. This left the
crew either smiling or bent over the side feeding the fishes. This must have
been appreciated because on a couple of occasions we were escorted across
the Biscay by dolphins, which raised even the skipper's morale!

Friday happy hour was the the half way point in our Biscay crossing and on
skipper's orders the mystery box was frantically torn open to the delight of
the crew. No spoilers on its content but we can confirm there was LEMON
CURD! (Editor's Note: On Campaign Chairman's Order!)
Happy hour's entertainment was the start of murder, which is where crew
members try to hand specific objects to each other in predetermined areas to
try and 'kill' them, for example you might have to "kill" the mate in the cockpit with
a clothes hanger.

Powering into Saturday morning on the back of 30 knot gusts, we left the bay
behind us lead to a drop in breeze and wave height making the roller coaster
ride turn into more of a Sunday afternoon cruise, an annoying blip in the
plan with speeds reduced to fractions of the previous couple of days. But
with a variety of sails going up and down the skipper and mate are
determined to find the most effective setup. With the sun continuing to
shine everyday, the drop in wind has caused a mass removal of layers.

Whilst writing this blog there is a crew's favourite cinnamon and honey loaf
with mixed dried fruit in the oven, which has become a white watch specialty
with everyone excited for it to be ready.

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